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100 Responses to Your Comments

  1. Marcel says:

    When my mom was suspected of having tuberculosis. I was immediately taken from her and adopted to a white family. Even though she had another child. This happened in 1961. Am I still eligible for this lawsuit?

    • marsha reany says:

      hey. my story sounds so familiar to yours even the year. nice to know i am not alone.. i feel contected to you. 🙂

      • marsha reany says:

        I would like to know how the years of time frame for who qualifies was chosen.. what about the rest of us.. this happened to lots of us before 1965 and our stories and losses and pains are the same.. please find an answer for us and post it .. thankyou

    • Patricia McCarthy says:

      Hi Marcel, It is my understanding from the information received from the lawyers that the criteria to be included would be that you were placed into care within Ontario between the years of 1965-1984 but you should contact the lawyers directly to verify that information and see if the dates have been expanded and would include you.

    • Linda Pelletier Phripp says:

      I , as well was taken away in 1961, placed with a white family , From 1962 too 1975 , then I ran away too find my real family , I was never adopted .

      • Linda Pelletier Phripp says:

        NOW , I have that sickening feeling of not belonging ,& lost ,That feeling never leaves you .

    • super says:

      This is a class action lawsuit meaning yes all of you are in 15yrs at this and we got a judge and I made sure we don’t pay for it too date to follow d chartrand

      • Lost to A Genocide of a generation says:

        What about the Metis/Cree children in Manitoba? My brothers and I were taken from our mother and adopted to a white family, in the early 70’s and moved to America. It’s sad, I saw on the news, how Canada said they welcomed immigrants with open arms, unlike America, but yet us native children were shipped off from Canada to America, away from our families and culture :(.

  2. cal says:

    theirs a warrior crying inside of me I feel powerless my spirit begs for its traditions, a mighty power shows its fangs, someones once said “one arrow is easy to break, but many arrows together you cannot break” so with that being said I am glad that we are joining together to fight the wrongs of this Goverment

    • I,too feel,soooo ,lost,hurt,disgusted,don’t know how,to,get close to anyone,,unless drunk,does,anyone,relate,to,this,?my,3children,also,was,scooped,in,the,60s,,I,also,had,a,stolen,childhood,no,money,in,this,cruel,world,will,ever,mend,all,of,our,hearts./broken,spirit./sigh,whew,/all,said,but,not,done,what,to,do?/unloved.

  3. glen Fox says:

    Hi, guess you know my first name…my story begins when i was bout 10 or 11, we were shipped to Kenora ontario and then placed in care in Whitefish Bay…bounced around from home to home, never getting to feel like we belong becuz we didn’t. we ended up being ripped apart, my brother Alex went to Kenora while I went to Sandy Lake ontario…finally eneding up in Sioux lookout.

  4. Sandy Roberts says:

    Please refer me to someone in the Manitoba providence to find legal help regarding getting an sixities scoop victum internationally transfered to Canada from the state of Louisiana.

    • Eva Pellettieri says:

      PLEASE ALSO REFER ME TO A MANITOBA CONNECTION FOR THIS CLASS ACTION SUIT,i AM ALSO PART OF THE SIXTIES SCOOP GROUP aND I HAVE A VERY INTERESTING STORY TO TELL SOMEONE ABOUT MY ADOPTION AS WELL
      MIIGWETCH
      . epell@live.ca

  5. solomon kakagamic says:

    The place i went was very bad, if my food needed sugar then salt was added ( large amounts). If salt was needed I got heaps of sugar and i was forced to eat all that was on my plate. I remember gaging and vomiting and being sick and getting spanked and hit if i vomitted my food

    • Della Spiriteyes7 says:

      i was whipped or beaten for trying to take seconds ..the indian kids had to sit at a card table in the corner of the kitchen, yet we 3 kids had to go do the farm chores 4 AM in 1961 ,we were turned into young child slaves, and had to steal food, in order, to grow and so do all, the farm labour on a huge cattle ranch ,= the abuse never leaves me alone ..somedays i just go walking 11 miles or walk all over the bush i know al the deer trails, or go into shock PTSD spiriteyes7

    • super says:

      sick people man they call me super been there done that sad too say this was never your fault you were always good child you kno i have to tell you something about me i did something that no one will ever believe they took my life spent most in well jail left alone in another counrty didnt help but you kno that i made my way to fed pen all bad no family to come and see you or kno you i took my hate out on weights got real big and fast they called me chief were i was while in i leared my culture and law i went to sweats one day a medicine man was there we had a sweat he told me you your going on a journey for your people you leave here do what you are doing 10 folds more time but if you leave here and find a new friend you will find your family so i did what the man said long story short went to work casino bingo caller then one day this guy ask us to come over for newyears we did free booze hell medicine man said find new friend find your family would you believe i did at his house operator gave me 21 no to call he insisted low and behold my mom 12.15 sweet yes my friends we are on a journey 15 years at this but i as well we are sueing the goverment CANADA for what they did to us waiting for judge sir thats all i told you i did somthing that most wouldnt believe were i was they had races and i ran the 100yd in 10,34 yea man they took my life the things that could have been my lawyer roch dupont 1888 567 7777 you wish to take this journey with us david chartrand

  6. bob brightnose says:

    i was about seven or eight along with my little brother when our grandfather the one raised me my brothers all stayed else where my grandfather drowned and the next day a float plane landed.im from cross lake manitoba some white people got out of the plane and asked us if we have ever been on a plane we said no and they asked us if we would like to go for a plane ride we siad yes. that plane ride lasted 8 yrs ended in mpls minn. this where we first seen tvs radio electricity we were told we were there because our parents didnt love us and that cross lake was a hell hole and that there was nothing there for us just drinking and voilence and welfare. our live were never the same even though we made it we sometimes still feel like outsiders we found our salvation in our culture.what happened in the states still haunts sometimes the horrible things i witnessed the ridicule and shame and most of all the abuse. i dont ever want my children and grandchildren to ever go through what i went throughi met others out there some did not make it home i still remeber them……………….

    • Ardis Wroge says:

      hi bob i just read a little of ur story and i scene that u were adopted to mpls mn , i also was taken from my family , i am from winnipeg manitoba , i have read alot of the stories and mine resembles alot of them ! i sit here with no family and am very upset that the canadian government is taking so long to compensate us ,their is no price tag u can put on wut we went thru and still are goin thru ! they alredy dont give us our treaty money ,like they shud i get 5dollars a year and this is 2014 , its sad that they feel like they can take advantage of us this bad .thats wy they do wut they do to us to shut us up , those treaties were written in the 1800’s and inflation has been went up they just dont want to give us anything , i truly beleive thats wy the 60’s scoop took place so that we wudnt have a voice . so they cud keep robbing us , so that we dont bring up these situations from history ,and now they got some nerve ,to not compensate us , i also was adopted to mpls mn. i am so disgusted with the government ! they just dont want the truth to come out . i pray that u have found peace in ur life . i did make it home ,but my family doesnt no how to talk to me cause they dont no me ,i dont blame them at all ,i just wish i cud be apart of their lives, like nothing ever happened ,seems almost impossible but ive been tryn to reach out to them.

  7. no identity says:

    My experience was based on “survival”, placed in homes that thought would bring us a better future. We were brought up in a home with “Salvation Army”, bootleg, and neglect. I remember being called a “squaw” from a Minister’s son in Kenora, Ontario who worked at the church near Garrow’s Park. I was crown ward, taken from my family at 3, and remember being screamed at by “Bonnie”, she threw us in the back of a bronco, told us to shut up while they drove us off the reservation . I was 3. I didn’t understand. I didn’t know, why or when we were told to run as they were literally scooping us up from Shoal Lake #39. Yes, Shoal Lake #39…days haven’t changed much and ways of thought haven’t changed. Yes, this assimilation has continued through recent years. And I do believe the C.A.S has failed to teach Aboriginal children their heritage. I still struggle to teach my children and it will be a challenge forever days. 😦 Thank you people whomever made my life choices, my family choices. Mii-gwetch!

  8. James says:

    HI, I was just wondering if my mom is able to apply for the law suit with you as she is from Manitoba, but was adopted out to a white home in the states in the sixties, Thanks

  9. Clara says:

    I too would like to know if there will be legal action in other provinces…I’m from BC and like my siblings & cousins we were taken as children -early 60’s …myself, although I don’t remember the circumstances around our apprehensions, I have suffered from physical abuse in foster homes

  10. Garry C says:

    Are we allowed as former children of C.A.S to look up who the workers were that took us from my reservation of Lac Seul. How are we suppose to know about all this information thats needed to fillout this application.

    • Patricia McCarthy says:

      Garry, I suggest you see what the closest CAS is to where you were apprended and contact them, they should be able to help you and release at your request your files and information.

  11. Feather says:

    I am from Ontario – I was taken/given up for adoption in 1969 approx. Adopted into a white family and grew up in an abusive home. What recourse is there for us?

    • Patricia McCarthy says:

      Hi Feather, I would think you could be a claimant in this action and should fill out the in take form on line to be included in this class action suit. As to resources in regards to the abuse you should file criminal charges against the abuser (if they are still alive and if time limits allow) and would hope that you could seek punitive damages to be able to afford emotional counseling to help you get past the abuse and moving forward in your life…

  12. Della says:

    At this time to this day I suffer PTSD ( Post traumatic Stress disorder and had numerous ”mini panic disorders” and had suffered many Nightmares to this day . I am now age of 60 yrs and
    I would like some apology for all the emotional, psychological and physical abuse over those
    7 yrs of child hood Slavery .

    • Patricia McCarthy says:

      Della you hit on an important topic, and that is that many of the native children taken in the sixties scoop were primarily used as labourers on farms and rural communities by their adoptive or foster home parents and while the majority of adoptive parents took in children with love and good intentions in their hearts not all the foster or adoptive parents were as well meaning. Yes an apology is in order but how do we expect the government to make amends and apologize to the native community as a whole, when the people that took place in, allowed and perpetuated this travesty of injustice are now long gone and can’t be held personally liable as they committed the offense while holding political offices?

    • Hi Della – we would like to connect with you on your story. Could you get in contact with us please on or before August 17th (this Wednesday)? Please email us at: thesixtiesscoopclaim@gmail.com. Thank you!

  13. Jean Paul says:

    The sixties scoop began exactly as it is indicated, in 1960 for that is the year I and two other of my siblings were scooped. I am a University Graduate now, but the climb up that painful hill was a long and hard one. I just graduated in 2007 and unfortunately me deteriorating health has put me on disability. I had attempted suicide between the ages of six and eight. At that time in my life, I could not bare pain I was internalizing and wanted to put an end to it. If there is any consolation I have to offer any of my fellow brothers and sisters out there, it is this, I healed myself with music, the guitar became my best friend and confidant. I took it every where I went.
    If any of you find yourself slipping emotionaly, take up an instrument and it will become your best friend too. You wil be abel to express your what ever emotion you are experiencing through your instrument and, by releasing this emotion will always be rejuvinated. I can leave this world now in peace, as, I have served the very country that persecuted and oppressed me, I am a decorated veteran, I participated in Bill C-31, I have by myself amended the Indian Act four times through Robert Naults office and I have twenty five grandchildren, four of which are great grandchildren.
    I hope that my experience with musical instruments can be of some comfort to you. Meegwetch !!!! Kanipawitmitik “Standing Tree” of the Algonquin Nation.

    “May the sun always shine warm and brightly upon
    your faces and the wind always be at your backs”

    PS, Please forgive any typos, my eyesight is not the best.

  14. Angela Ashawasegai says:

    hello everyone,
    I am part of the scoop survivors. My non-native adoptive family abused me and brainwashed me to believe in the steretypes of Indians consequently, I had serious identity conflict as a young woman. i ran away from my abusive home and I was homeless for awhile. I have found my birth family but the relationship is not satisfying, we are like strangers. I am dealing with post traumatic stress as an adult, I live with nightmares, depression, hypervigilance. I feel tremendous losses. I have lived my whole life feeling like I have no family. I have lost my culture, lost my family, lost my language-ojibway. I ended up in CAS care twice in my life, before I was adopted and again when I ran away from home at age 16. Very haunting life experiences.

  15. I commented yesterday and looks like it didn’t post. so here I go again. I was adopted in 1966 into a non-native home. I was abused and treated like a household slave until I ran away at age 16. I endured the brainwashing of Indian stereotypes and I grew up to have serious identity conflict. I have coped with post trauma stress, homelessness, hypervigilance, nightmares, night terrors and depression. I have lost my family and I grew up feeling unloved, unsupported. I have met my birth family and our connection is still distant. I coped with racism, sexism. I take life one day at a time. Looks like I am not alone. So I hope the court hearing turns in our favor. We are strong but we still need mental health support for our healing.

  16. Patricia McCarthy says:

    On behalf of my husband Paul Russell McCarthy (Esquimaux). Paul struggles with his identity constantly. Having been apprehended at an early age and with just cause he became a ward of the crown and was passed about from place to place in foster or residential homes until given out to adoption without having any prior meetings or socialization with the “White” family would would become his adoptive parents. Literally being handed over to strangers from another culture who would become his “Family” people with little to no knowledge or desire to understand the culture of his birth and who would deny him access to such information, deny his requests to visit his former community not even attend his own maternal Grandfathers funeral services. During his lifetime with the adoptive family he never felt he fit into their home and was always treated not as a son as the natural children of the adoptive parents were treated, he would fight to avoid abuse in a predominately white community where his adoptive parents resided, again making it further evident he was not of their culture but not sure where he belonged. When finally old enough to return to the community he originated from he was not welcomed by his birth Mother or the community as she had given up hope of ever seeing him again when he was apprehended and taken into the Children’s Aid’s Custody. To this day Paul still struggles with his identity often commenting that he wished he was not a native. His two daughters also struggle trying to learn of their culture’s without his guidance or instruction as he himself has lost touch with his heritage and culture and it’s practices. During the recent Case appeals hearing of Oct 28th which I personally attended I could see from one of the judges comments that he feels the government should not be liable for damages to people that happened over time and that the harm done was not foreseeable at the time of the sixties scoop, I beg to differ as I can say that immediately those children suffered culture shock being taken and placed in non native communities as anyone would if taken from the only way of life they knew of and forced to assimilate into another culture totally unknown to them. The way I concluded the motion to appeal was that at least one of the 3 judges hearing the appeals motion had basically already pre-trialed the case with a negative conclusion. I was also upset at the after motion meetings with the lead lawyer on the class action suit when some of the people he represented thought the case was more about money that about the actions it stands for in regards to making steps towards preventing this type of child scooping and cultural genocide from happening again today or in the future. Yes, I agree that having the government make financial payment to band aide the pain suffered is one way to help our people but it is only a token way of apology and any funds gained from this class action suit will not correct the poverty issues for the native peoples as a whole. This type of payment gained from the suit if the result is favorable would not be in the amount significant to heals all ills suffered by our native brother and sisters. I was also upset to hear one of the crowd complain about the lawyers on the suit and suggested she take over the lawyers jobs… personally I found that insulting considering the time and effort the “Team” of lawyers has put into the case to date along with the years of education and law practice the entire team of lawyers has in their skills sets for someone without benefit of being legally allowed to practice law in Canada to suggest such a thing. We are not hear to sling muck at one another or blame before the case is even moved as a motion to hearing… We should count our selves lucky to have any lawyer willing to fight such an uphill battle as this one will be. Of course for those that don;t understand the time and effort and resources that will be required of our lawyers in regards to this action it may seem they are not doing their jobs but ignorance is no excuse for their behavior or their show of disrespect, something our people are fighting to gain respect!, therefore I would like to suggest we do not show disrespect towards others in ignorance if we expect others to show us respect. I hope the courts will allow this case to move forward and be heard with an open mind and respect of what the children of the sixties scoop experienced at the time of apprehension and throughout their lives as a result of the governments in-actions to ensure these Native American children’s cultural differences were attended to, as with families of Asian or Afro American children in respect to their cultural differences when being placed in foster or adoptive homes. Hoping this case motions forward to a hearing and looking forward to being their to support and further the public attention to this case. Mrs. Patricia L. McCarthy.

  17. 647-854-3570 says:

    I feel for everyone who was taken away from their native culture, i am one of those people.
    I was taken away from CAS at a young age given to white catholic people not knowing who I was. I grew up with two foster sisters, one who was kind of my friend and the other one hated me so much that she liked to get me into trouble everyday. I knew I was different from the rest of my foster family whom at the time I believed was my real family not knowing the truth on who I really was. I thought I was loved until one day when I did something wrong I was beaten daily by my foster mom but it was a way that she left no evidence because the bruises would be under the clothing, and when I was alone in the house after school sometimes when my foster mom started working again my foster dad would come home in a really crappy mood and he would yell at me for no reason just because he had a bad day at work but it became so bad that he would take his anger out on me by sexually assulting me. This went on for years until I turned 16 when I found out the truth from CAS and my foster parents.
    Now I’m glad that justice is finally being done! I want my story to be told!….

  18. Tom Brassoy says:

    Yes I too was adopted and taken away from all I every knew. I feel cheated of my culture and my siblings who were all spread around Ontario.Raised in a all white community where I didn’t even speak English.This brings back a lot of pain for me as I’m sure it does to many Aboriginal People in the same boat. I hope we can all find some peace in our souls.!!!!!

  19. Joanne Schuller says:

    I don’t understand what the criteria even is anymore to be involved in this class action.?

    • The new criteria is now posted under “About the Ontario Sixties Scoop Claim + Registration as a Class Member” on this website.

      • Jessica Johnson says:

        I filled in a register form for Ontario, but got a response from BC stating i should contact Ontario. Seems that until 1996,I didn’t exist in BC.
        They didn’t ask about name changes or other things like marriage/divorce. So now I’m kinda irked about my registration here and the emotional slap to the face that came with that cold response.
        I moved here in the middle of grade six. Left Halloween night in fact, grew up, left school, got married, had a child, divorced and am a grandmother, but they stated “no record of you until 1996”, as a resident of BC.
        Yeah, just a little irked

      • Hello Jessica
        I made a facebook page for people like yourself could join. It is called FInding Your Roots. I am a product of the 60s Scoop as well. I am still on my journey finding my roots. You are welcome to join. The group is a place for people to come together and help each other with answers to questions that other people might have. The place is also for people to learn from one another as they prepare to find their own roots. I encourage you to look the group up. If anything this group may be a place for healing and understanding one another. Take care.
        Michael Henricks
        Facebook Group- FInding Your Roots

  20. Re. USA Placed Victims-Survivors of Canadian Scoops, please go to blog google’able at: USA Placed Victims-Survivors of Canadian Scoops. Class actions out of USA are also building and separately from those in Canada because though 1 USA Placed Victim-Survivor of Canadian Scoops has been recognized by TRC-Canada (that recognition encouraging USCIS to also provide him his USA Citizenship, forgive crimes committed as result of his status as victim of Scoops genocide, etc.), because the mandate of TRC-Canada does not include those victims who were placed in USA (the mandate only covers those who were kept within Canada), USA Placed Scoop Victims have to approach civil suit-legal remedy differently.

    I would like to coordinate with this blog, sixtiesscoopclaim.com/ the class action administrator, as much as possible to the extent that it’s helpful for both groups.

    Thank you.

  21. Donna says:

    Is there any class action lawsuits for sask.? Because I have many family members who would like to learn more about this ?

  22. Hugh Garth Gaddis says:

    hi my name is Hugh Garth Gaddis i was born feburary 11 1972 Norway House, manitoba .i was adopted from brandon MB. to a small town called Dandrigde, TN. U.S.A. at age of 2 to Robbie & Robert Gaddis who had also another on from montana . they had 3 other children of there own . i came back to meet my real family from N.H. in 1989 ended up staying and making my own family with addiction from not noing who i was and abuses . i have 4 childen of my own now wel if you have any imformation about how to find out how to get in this lawsuit . getting involved on getting process going im intrested so contact me

  23. Susie Moose/Thorassie says:

    Hi my name is Susie and I was abducted by child and family services when I was 4 or 5 ,and they lured me into their car,I was abused and everything was taken from me for 11 yrs,abused for yrs while under care,its time to tell our stories now,its still hurts to think about it and to talk about it…….my email is. black_whitesheep@live.ca

  24. J Larabee says:

    My name is Jesse Larabee and I am a member of a class action lawsuit. The suit claims the province failed to take all necessary steps to protect the rights of Crown wards to apply for compensation from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board or to file personal injury claims for children who were abused prior to or while in the care of the Province.I am hoping to receive financial compensation. I would like the compensation to be used exclusively on therapy and education.

  25. Mila says:

    Good day I had been hoping through my life to meet you people I wish a long time ago there had been a group made so we can meet its been so lonely not knowing what was wrong but I knew as a young child I was not “at home” we become displaced disorientated as the “sixties scoop children” we have no identity we have no culture we have no language yet we have our skin color to make life harder in trying to figure out our place in this huge world…I was five years old when I was taken and my Mother passed on not telling me about that day that I left I have four stories of that day …so really I don’t why what or how but I do know I am powerful I do know I am a proud Native woman who got her Masters degree..but I am humble to this day to find my identity my language (this is something the white majority did a great injustice they took our language our identity).. at times I wish I could wake up and be fluent in my Oji-Cree dialect I would speak all over the world in the language of my ancestors…that would be an honor to be able to speak to my Elders to get their thoughts their advice (because you see when the Oji-Cree language is translated into English it loses its originality) there are many things I wish for us as the “sixties people” But most of all I wish us peace…peace and forgiveness.. I know some of us were beaten abused and sworn at that we were nothing….and this has to told and rectified we have to be acknowledged for our healing to happen……Miigwetch

  26. Derek says:

    what if any is there a class action lawsuit for manitoba and who would one contact for that, was taken in 1976 and adopted to a military anglican family suffered mental, emotional, physcalogical and even physcial abuse

  27. Michael Sherry says:

    This is my political hat, this resolution from the Canadian Bar Association should be adopted for 60’s scoop folks as well, given the vulnerability that we come to the table with.

    Guidelines for Lawyers Acting for Survivors of Aboriginal Residential Schools

    WHEREAS survivors of Aboriginal residential schools are often vulnerable and in need of healing as well as legal assistance;

    WHEREAS the identity of persons who attended Aboriginal residential schools is available without their consent;

    WHEREAS survivors of Aboriginal residential schools wanting to seek compensation from the Government of Canada and the churches involved should have legal assistance which takes into account the potential impact on their well-being when they begin to address their abuse;

    BE IT RESOLVED THAT:

    1. The Canadian Bar Association urge each law society to adopt the following guidelines for recommended conduct for lawyers acting or seeking to act for survivors of Aboriginal residential schools, that recognizes their vulnerability and need for healing:

    (a) Lawyers should not initiate communications with individual survivors of Aboriginal residential schools to solicit them as clients or inquire as to whether they were sexually assaulted;

    (b) Lawyers should not accept retainers until they have met in person with the client, whenever reasonably possible;

    (c) Lawyers should recognize that survivors had control taken from their lives when they were children and therefore, as clients, should be given as much control as possible over the direction of their case;

    (d) Lawyers should recognize that survivors may be seriously damaged from their experience, which may be aggravated by having to relive their childhood abuse, and that healing may be a necessary component of any real settlement for these survivors. Lawyers should therefore be aware of available counselling resources for these clients to ensure that they have opportunities for healing prior to testifying;

    (e) Lawyers should recognize that damage to the survivors of Aboriginal residential schools may well include cultural damages from being cut off from their own society, and should endeavour to understand their clients’ cultural roots;

    (f) Lawyers should recognize that survivors are often at risk of suicide or violence towards others and should ensure appropriate instruction and training for their own employees, including available referrals in time of crisis;

    2. This resolution be sent to each law society in Canada for implementation, as well as to the Assembly of First Nations, Congress of Aboriginal People, Inuit Tapiritsat of Canada and other National Aboriginal organizations for distribution to aboriginal peoples across Canada.

  28. Michael Sherry says:

    This is my political hat, this resolution from the Canadian Bar Association should be adopted for 60’s scoop folks as well, given the vulnerability that we come to the table with.

    Guidelines for Lawyers Acting for Survivors of Aboriginal Residential Schools

    WHEREAS survivors of Aboriginal residential schools are often vulnerable and in need of healing as well as legal assistance;

    WHEREAS the identity of persons who attended Aboriginal residential schools is available without their consent;

    WHEREAS survivors of Aboriginal residential schools wanting to seek compensation from the Government of Canada and the churches involved should have legal assistance which takes into account the potential impact on their well-being when they begin to address their abuse;

    BE IT RESOLVED THAT:

    1. The Canadian Bar Association urge each law society to adopt the following guidelines for recommended conduct for lawyers acting or seeking to act for survivors of Aboriginal residential schools, that recognizes their vulnerability and need for healing:

    (a) Lawyers should not initiate communications with individual survivors of Aboriginal residential schools to solicit them as clients or inquire as to whether they were sexually assaulted;

    (b) Lawyers should not accept retainers until they have met in person with the client, whenever reasonably possible;

    (c) Lawyers should recognize that survivors had control taken from their lives when they were children and therefore, as clients, should be given as much control as possible over the direction of their case;

    (d) Lawyers should recognize that survivors may be seriously damaged from their experience, which may be aggravated by having to relive their childhood abuse, and that healing may be a necessary component of any real settlement for these survivors. Lawyers should therefore be aware of available counselling resources for these clients to ensure that they have opportunities for healing prior to testifying;

    (e) Lawyers should recognize that damage to the survivors of Aboriginal residential schools may well include cultural damages from being cut off from their own society, and should endeavour to understand their clients’ cultural roots;

    (f) Lawyers should recognize that survivors are often at risk of suicide or violence towards others and should ensure appropriate instruction and training for their own employees, including available referrals in time of crisis;

    2. This resolution be sent to each law society in Canada for implementation, as well as to the Assembly of First Nations, Congress of Aboriginal People, Inuit Tapiritsat of Canada and other National Aboriginal organizations for distribution to aboriginal peoples across Canada.

  29. Michael Sherry says:

    I am Namgis First Nations from the foster care system, birth to nineteen, permanent ward. I have recently been in contact with Klein Lyons who is pursuing a class action certification for around 500 folks in BC, they also have a data base of 1000. I had a long discussion with an assistant, one Debra Wong, who indicated to me that they are only interested in the money and garnering knowledge. I have a number of concerns around this law firm representing this class action. That being said I am sending you this email to see if you could help resource me with an Aboriginal Lawyer or Law Firm who could help me. There should be a number of Aboriginal lawyers who have worked with our people in BC around the class action specific to the residential school lawsuit.

    Ontario 60’s scoop class action was won recently in the lower courts but is currently being appealed by the Federal government thus the BC certification is about 3 to 4 years away and then another 10 years to get through the courts for BC.

    Any help you could give me would be greatly appreciated.

  30. claudette says:

    My mom claudette is 52 now she was taken from her mom in 1965 she was put in foster to foster home cause nobody wanted her because she wet the bed so they placed her in the youth centre even tho she did nothing wrong then her mom passed away when she was 5 and wasn’t allowed to attend the funeral a little after that she placed with a couple and the lady was a prison guard use to beat my mom and make her a slave cfs did come to visit but my mom was not allowed to mention nothing or she would get beatin up and the lady would sit there with them to make sure of that she was put through a lot I just want to know if there’s any kind of seattlement of some sort she can look into ??

  31. chad w says:

    Does any one know anything about Foster natives children that were in social services care getting compensation for the samethings that happened in the residential and 60s scoop. I was I a long term Ward to social Services and I went through alot in a Foster home. I had to find my own real family..now I’m not wanted by my real mother that hurts. Cause of the system I was in. Can I get anything from the government. Can inbox me any info..thank u.

  32. Willie hurren says:

    I knew there had to be others like me andmy 3 sisters we were scooped from cranberry portage mb in spring of1974 I was in my grade 3 class room when welfare guy grabbed me from my desk they alrdy had my sisters in the van off to flin flon in a very mean,abusive foster home for next yr me and baby sis violet in one foster home and my other 2sisters in another home. We were lucky I guess if you can call it that got adopted all together into the states in Illinois told us our mom and dad died later found out they paid Mb govt $500. S piece for the 4 of us. Yrs later after physical and sexual abuse I found my way back none of my real family wants any thing to do with us I feel empty ,lost lost all identity lonely. So many lonely tear filled nights wondering why me ,why us thought bout suicide and had many drunk weeks and weeks turned into months. I have 2 kids now god bless them they are my reason I get up and go to work I promised them no matter what daddy will always love them thru thick or thin. How do I get in touch with a lawyer in Mb for compensation and is there a list I can put my name on as well as my sisters. I hope I qualify for this I’m so glad I found this felt so lost and empty please get in touch with me or send me a phone number. Thanks Willie Hurren Regina sask

  33. Darrell peters says:

    I spent 14 years in foster care in the 1960s 70s and 80s. I lived in Mennonite foster homes under the language of Deutlow Germaine,and the tone I lived in was St. Laurent. Had many conflicts and fights with these Métis people. I failed two grades in school due to me not being able to communicate properly in the languages of métis and German. Religion in the Roman Catholic and religion in the Christian culture want to my beliefs. As a result I was strapped slapped punched kicked and had my hair pulled. This was a very discriminating time in my life. Unfortunately for me I had a hard time coping in life. Acceptance was such a big issue that I eventually join the Armed Forces to be in a brotherhood. I didn’t get in the acceptance in the Armed Forces and had to wait my way out. When I hit 70 street I had a hard time of acceptance and hard time excepting the fact that I was different different. I eventually got into a fight on the street and hurt the person and was incarcerated 18 years of my life. Life continues to be a hell. I’m still pissed off and I hope that I will have my day and have my say.

  34. John says:

    It’s about fighting for us I feel like I have had to fight my whole life!!!!
    Having one of my earliest childhood memories being torn away from my family on the rez and placed with an abusive white family in a big city has given me night mares my whole life. My problem now is they get mixed up with the combat night mares that have to do with my Post Traumatic Stress Disorder that has disabled me from the army.
    I live back on the homestead now but don’t know the language, faith, anything really and my first question when I meet anyone new is are we related its mixed up for sure.
    Any way prayers for all

    • Hello John
      I made a facebook page for people like yourself could join. It is called FInding Your Roots. I am a product of the 60s Scoop as well. I am still on my journey finding my roots. You are welcome to join. The group is a place for people to come together and help each other with answers to questions that other people might have. The place is also for people to learn from one another as they prepare to find their own roots. I encourage you to look the group up. If anything this group may be a place for healing and understanding one another. Take care.
      Michael Henricks
      Facebook Group- FInding Your Roots

  35. Michael Henricks says:

    I’m a product of the 60s Scoop. Adopted at birth in Winnipeg Manitoba. No name on my birth registry at the hospital. Seriously I had a number! Adopted at birth into a white family. I endured many similar experiences through that family. I was then put into foster care where I endured more various trauma. Many homes, homeless, druggie, and no identity.
    Now at 43 years young, an honors degree at 2013 and reunited with my father and father’s family only 3 years ago. I work with youth in the justice system and help kids who live with me and my wife. I’m part of the 60s Scoop Lawsuit (I think I am anyways).
    I would like to start a chapter of sorts which supports 60’s Scoop people who need advice or wanting to help others. I want to help people who came from the same situations. The TRC was just the beginning, now we have just as much dysfunction within both sides of the fence, so to speak.
    It’s time to start a chapter from province to province. If there is not anything started right now for people to learn form one another, lets start it. If there is something that is already there, then let me join and help provide solutions for the dysfunction, pain and suffering that people are carrying with them. A chapter province-wide, will give us the chance to rewrite the history books.

    If anyone is interested please reply or leave a comment.
    Thank-you for your time and consideration, I look forward to hearing from you all!

  36. Kimberley Jones says:

    I know about my family since I had a stroke in 2012

  37. Mavis Evans says:

    Hello my name is Mavis and I was taken away from my mother because she was an alcoholic, but she loved us. But anyways I was 6 years old when I was placed on a farm with a white family living in Starbuck, Manitoba Canada. Actually they treated me as their child and I was a happy little girl when I was living there. But as soon as I turned 10 years old and I was happy that day until a man and a lady came into the house and asked me if I wanted to go shopping with my brother and sister, and of course being little it was exciting to go shopping. But it wasn’t true. They took us kids to another family who lived in a whole different country and this was in New Enterprise, Pennsylvania and the family kept us and we lived with them for about a year, but that was a rough year living there with them, because when it came to eating they only gave us an ice cream scoop of food for our plates. Then after we ate up the food, my sister and I thought we could help ourselves, but when we went to grab the spoon to scoop more potatoes or something else, my foster dad would have a ruler and or use their hands and slap us away from the food. So we didn’t have any more food to eat, so the only way to survive was wait for everyone to sleep and my sister and I would head to the fridge and steal some food and bring it into our room and eat. Once we got caught for doing that, our foster dad would get his belt and whipped us like dogs.
    I really hated that family and reported to the teacher in school. So she reported to the Child and Family Services and then they showed up that evening and I told them what had happen , so my sister had to go out and speak to them.and then they talked to my brother too. But he was treated like a king there
    So the Child and Family Services wanted to talk to me again and they said my sister wanted to leave them and my brother wanted to stay there. So they ask me if I can put up with them for 2 more weeks. I said yeah I guess. But as 1 week went by it was the second week that was just starting. Child and Family Services told us to get our things packed up, so we were excited to pack, but the things this family got us clothes toys records or music stuff, they told us we could not take the things they bought us. So I said who cares we will get the things back that we left behind.

    So we both got into the car and head back to Pennsylvania again. But this time we were living with a big family who had lot of foster and her own children there. And the family told us they lived way up in the mountains . It was a very nice family and treated us respect. They made sure we had enough food. We were aloud to have seconds and never got slapped for it. But by then I was 11 years old. And the family never treated us like dirty. As the days and weeks went by we can finally watch TV and go outdoors and play in the playground that our foster dad made for the kids to play. There were monkey bars, swings and sea saws and baby rocking animals and a playhouse. And a merry go round. I really enjoyed it there and we eventually got a pool tablet that they already made another part for the house and they took down some of the wall and put on a sliding doors and put a pool there and we could go for a swim. We had it made there. But as the days and weeks went by it was getting very close for Christmas and we found d out they didn’t celebrate Christmas at all.

    So they explained it and been with them until I turned 18 years of age. Then I left them and starting to run around the city there.

    But as soon as I was living on my own I sort of quit going to the meetings they attended. But when I left Jersey Shore, I moved to Williamsport, and I was on my own and when I turned 19 after a year I was still living in Williamsport Pennsylvania and later that week when I was wondering around. My sister was over at my place where I was living and wanted to give me the good news that we were heading back home to Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada. So we had to go get check ups and our real aunty Janice came to get us. So that night she was at the Holiday Inn and ask my sister what can we do? My sister said I don’t know what we can do. So after that my Aunty ask my sister if she knew where there was bingo game. So my sister told her to check the papers. So she did and found d the bingo. So we went and it was my first time ever to go to a bingo. And all of us together went out of the bingo and had 600 hundred dollars. But end up leaving and come back home. So we came home back to Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada and then I felt sad and wanted to go back to Williamsport, Pa. But end up living my life here and went wondering around. But end up looking for the religion I went to when I was living in the states. I did find one and it was located on Ellice Avenue and not to far from my aunties place. But once I was going back into my religion, I would go and leave them and then finally after I associated with a guy for awhile I quit going to the religion. But now I have left him and had a child with him I have another man and he treated me better and had 2 children with him. Then I never bothered with my religion for about 20 years later. Then I wanted to head back to the meetings again and my man and I had our up and downs with this religion, but now he let’s me go and we are married and living happy and attending my meetings regularly and I became an unbaptized publisher and now I am going to be baptized in October 11,2015. So that is my life story. But might of missed a bit in the story but close enough any ways. !!!!!!☺

    • Hello Mavis
      I made a facebook page for people like yourself could join. It is called FInding Your Roots. I am a product of the 60s Scoop as well. I am still on my journey finding my roots. You are welcome to join. The group is a place for people to come together and help each other with answers to questions that other people might have. The place is also for people to learn from one another as they prepare to find their own roots. I encourage you to look the group up. If anything this group may be a place for healing and understanding one another. Take care.
      Michael Henricks
      Facebook Group- FInding Your Roots

  38. Salio Fiddler says:

    My childhood memories of being placed in various foster care homes are with anger, resentments, and feelings of getting justice by getting some revenge on those past family’s & people that abused, tormented, and humiliated me while I was innocent, young, and vulnerable.

    The hardest part about being placed in all these strange places is that they all pretended to care for you and yet receive beatings and starve you. I hated those so-called-love-warming new families.

    I just want to see or know about my biological parents. I’ve spent years searching for my mom, dad, sister or brother….any relative but, never any luck.
    The Government and Child&family Services
    Sure made@$! Sure that I would never find my true identity and parents.

    That’s all I can share for now. I’m certainly
    A lot of us Sixties Scoped kids have a lot of resentments.

    I remain,

    Sal Fiddler (until I find my true identity)

    • Hello Salio
      I made a facebook page for people like yourself could join. It is called FInding Your Roots. I am a product of the 60s Scoop as well. I am still on my journey finding my roots. You are welcome to join. The group is a place for people to come together and help each other with answers to questions that other people might have. The place is also for people to learn from one another as they prepare to find their own roots. I encourage you to look the group up. If anything this group may be a place for healing and understanding one another. Take care.
      Michael Henricks
      Facebook Group- FInding Your Roots

  39. les burgoyne says:

    I was in a receiving home in wpg I was put into 13 foster homes and a ward of cfs for many years. Everything was taken from me . my family my siblings everything. I went through every horor imaginable from daily beatings to sexual abuse to being treated as a slave by alcoholic step parents. They threw me to the wolves at age 14 and I lived in garbage dumpsters eating thrown away food and being passed around by gay older men I had to sell myself to survive. Pissed to to the life that I had to live. These memories stay with me to this day I still have night mares. Thank you

  40. Hello Darrell
    I made a facebook page for people like yourself could join. It is called FInding Your Roots. I am a product of the 60s Scoop as well. I am still on my journey finding my roots. You are welcome to join. The group is a place for people to come together and help each other with answers to questions that other people might have. The place is also for people to learn from one another as they prepare to find their own roots. I encourage you to look the group up. If anything this group may be a place for healing and understanding one another. Take care.
    Michael Henricks
    Facebook Group- FInding Your Roots

  41. debbie thompson says:

    who can I contact for myself and two other siblings for we were placed in 1972

  42. Adrienne says:

    I must say this lawsuit is very black and white, what I know is that many native families including many of my birth family left the reserve due to poor conditions, and abuse!! Once they left and tried to begin their lives in society they and their children were targeted to be scooped by CCAS/CAS with endorsements from the government!! My mother had all five of her children taken, given no assistance to find legal representation or support!! I was abused by the family that adopted me and was never told or educated on my heritage!!! I didn’t get my status card until I was in my 30’s and I still have difficulties and have not had my status card for the past few years!!! I have had to try and find my people, find my culture and not felt welcomed by all!! I feel not welcomed or accepted by my adopted family or my birth!! I have struggled my entire life!!! This lawsuit does to include me it seems as I was not born on my reserve yet due to the government and its genocide my life has and continues to be affected!!! My brothers as well!!! This just seems completely ludicrous and unfair!!!

  43. super says:

    That’s why I’m suing them there not getting away with this oh we got judge to hear our case Manitoba class action lawsuit this is what we all been waiting for All of us David chartrand 15yrs at this

  44. Joseph W A says:

    This is crime committed by Canada and Canada should pay restitution!!

  45. Reginald Davis says:

    I was taking also with my brother to the States. So how do we get to be a part of that s lawsuit?

  46. David Frieling says:

    When I came back to Cross Lake Manitoba in 95 I told myself that I would try to feel at home again. But I haven’t yet. I look Native but Im treated like an outsider. In the states people called me chief but here they call me an apple. Where was the help for me to reintegrate back into my family. Even to this day I cant find employment that doesn’t come with racism. My adoptive name has gotten me a lot of good jobs but as soon as they realized who they hired they managed to push me out. Every interview ends with the speech “This company is not responsible for any racial problems I might come across while working with the regular workers”. The only choice I have is to be self employed and that has had just as many road blocks. I came back to Canada with the hopes of having a better life and more control over it. I deserve to be treated with respect and I earned it.

  47. I lived in 14 foster homes. Ineed not say more

  48. Connie calderwood says:

    I was part of the sixties scoop and it caused so much trauma in my life not knowing who I was. My adopted family hated aboriginal people… all I heard was jokes about how they drink . I was abused mentally and physically once my mother passed away . Although she did hit me too. I was never good enough for them . My father blamed me for my adopted mother dying from cancer. That has affected me for years . How can a 13 year old children cause her to die I thought. I thought it was my fault. I now know little about it and took a course at college child and youth care worker with aboriginal people the focus . I learned about colonization, residential school and the sixties scoop. I also to another course aboriginal healing , trauma and resiliency. I wanted to share my story however there is more to it . Thanks u Connie

  49. I, ve done the application many times and have recieved nothing , is this settlement going to happen or are we going to be swept under the carpet by the gov.t again

  50. Reginald Davis says:

    Only if you are Indian from Ontario

  51. Reginald Davis says:

    Good thing It happened in Ontario any other provinces you would be s.o.l.

  52. John Webb says:

    Separated from my other siblings at six my sister and I where adopted out to a white family from the suburbs of Toronto. They lived in a neighborhood where every one had two cars to dogs and two children but where unable to have their own. Raised to believe Indians where nothing but drunken scum laying in the gutter you can only guess at the surprise to find out in my late twenties when I met all my Indians sisters. Unfortunately it was not until I was fifty at the funeral of my older brother that I was able to meet for the first time my youngest brother who was a baby when we where separated. We missed out on forty four years of life together, that can never be returned in any way.
    To day I am a retired Veteran I suffer from PTSD from my service and also a depression disorder. Truthfully though lets face it mental trauma is cumulative it doesn’t just go away no matter how much treatment you just learn to deal with it. Today I live home on the reserve in my hereditary home. I try to give back to my community I volunteer with the health unit as a youth mentor they are our tomorrow and the future of our people. If we are to break the cycle and advance for seven generations we need to be accountable our selves.
    Thank you for taking the time to read my ramble John

    • Adrienne says:

      The ramble was awesome!! Proud of you and your attitude about it all!! Thank- you for sharing!!

    • Lost to A Genocide of a generation says:

      I also am a military Vet and suffer from severe PTSD, anxiety, and have felt the loss of a family and my own culture and heritage. I was placed in a white family in the US at 4. I never truly felt I belonged or was wanted. My adopted mother physically abused me, would cut my hair off as punishment, degrade me and tell me my real mother was a drunken Indian that didn’t want me. I was molested by their oldest son for years and as soon as I could, I joined the US military and left. Others can’t relate to what we’ve endured and lost. To never see a face that resembles you, and know there is blood relatives that you will probably never meet or even know if your birth parents are still alive. We have been thrown away, and discarded as a government’s burden and will always carry these scars, hate, saddness, and inner turmoil. Someone must be held accountable for our pain and suffering.

  53. BB says:

    It is not the parliament of canada who pulled this all off! The parliament of canada are employees of the treasury board. The treasury board is owned by the privy council office. The parliament of canada does what the privy council office orders. The privy council office does what the Lord Privy Seal orders. The lord privy seal, alias HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND c. o. b. currently as Tina Stowell does what the Vatican court dictates.

    What compensation can be expected? There is no money! Any compensation will come from the Indian Fund which was laundered into the consolidated revenue fund at “con federation”.

  54. Tj says:

    I was adopted into a non aboriginal family when i was 2 weeks old in 1980 met my birth mother in 2000 and am no longer in talks with her due to personal reasons and growing up i had no chance at learning my culture and spent alot of my life not knowing anything about it and now that im learning of this sixties scoop this has me questioning alot about what this is about if anyone can message me and tell me more about it and if this is something thats in manitoba as im from manitoba. i dont understand it but am very curious if this makes me someone who is a part of what this is for

  55. Reginald Davis says:

    Like you I was taking and adopted , I ended up in the States. But this thing is only if you’ve been adopted from Ontario only . I think they should include the rest of Canada

  56. Julia brandon says:

    Im one of those children from the 60 s scoop. I wasnt adopted out. I was in several group homes. I m 60 now..hard for me to be in any kind of relationship. Self talk lately has helped..painful when i think of how i was owned by the govt..placed here And there..6 page letter was my file from my childrens aid society care..

  57. cliff says:

    i could care less about money, money cant fix this one ,

  58. Shirley C says:

    I answered all of the questions, but some of them were not a very clear ‘yes or no’ answer. I, and my two younger siblings were made a Crown Wards of the CAS in the late 70’s or early 80’s I think # 6 said something about being adopted and I answered ‘yes’ but I was not adopted, I chose to stay a Crown Ward so I could return home when I came of age to leave.

    • Les Burgoyne says:

      Plain and simple.their obviously going through this lawsuit to benefit themselves.they do not give a flyers crap about what all of us had to go through. Just give up and move on. They will get all the money and give nothing to all the other survivors. Screw them bunch of money hungry assholes. Awe poor me poor me. Crying to the govt. Well what about the rest of us. I’m a survivor olso but I have up .You all might as well to. Because no one will get anything.a waste of time. Hagd

  59. Tauni Sheldon says:

    Where can I go for personal support, specifically about being scooped? I especially have a very hard time around my birthday. My adoptive parents cannot identify in the social hell and the physical hell that I’ve always had, nor do I expect them to. “You have it good. Deal with it”. They’re not Inuit. To my birth mother, ” you will never be recognized as born” (in her words to me) because being taken has left very deep trauma. She never had any more children for fear that they would be forceably taken like I was. I’m tired. I feel eaten up. I thought that I was “normalizing”; however, I still lapse into depression, anxiety and overwhelming sadness. I feel torn in wanting to be Inuk while at the same time, hating being born at all. The physical, emotional and psychological traumas are deeper on many levels. I can’t open up with my story in the Class Action suits, I am also not First Nations, I am Inuk. Not even in the Aboriginal reconciliations am I accepted. I am rational to compartmentalize and understand that living with PTSD (that’s the official diagnosis) doesn’t have to consume me; however, in the middle of the pit, I feel stuck and concreted in. Double sigh.

    • Les Burgoyne says:

      I am sorry.i am a 60 scoop survivor and I even filled an application.i went through all the abuse being adopted into a alcahol fuelled white family. The scars stay with me daily. They told me I do not qualify. You can imagine how I felt .I felt betrayed. Shame on them this lawsuit is for the claimant s not for the people who went through this. Nobody will ever see a dime. So don’t.t feel bad many have suffered. Good luck hope your life gets better.

  60. Priscilla K says:

    I was one of those pictured in Today’s Child in the Toronto Star. I had my picture taken with two of my brothers. They made us look so innocent like nothing is wrong but when I look at pictures from some of the foster homes (especially the last one), our faces tell a different story and my younger brother is always crying. We had nightmares for years when we were finally adopted. All three of us suffered from substance abuse. We never felt that we really fit it. Two of us were also in trouble with the law as well. This decision will help me get some closure on what happened to us. I did get a chance to meet my birth mother and other relatives. I wasn’t able to meet my birth father. He passed away before I had a chance. I still have a very good relationship with my birth mom. Each time I go see her, I find out new information and more puzzle pieces are starting to be put together. It will be a long process for me but I am still on my healing path. There are so many of us out there. I hope they will be able to find some sort of closure. This also goes to their siblings and children who were also ultimately affected by this tragedy. Hopefully, people will know about it and understand what had happened and to not let it happen again.

    Miigwetch

    • Les Burgoyne says:

      I am not excited by the news of the sixties scoop lawsuit.comanda is going to take the money and run. Us survivors will get Nothing.you.ll see.comandas lawsuit is about commanda nothing else.

  61. Margaret McCartney says:

    I am from an Ontario band but was adopted in Manitoba.
    Who do I contact?

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